Stephen Jackson confirms that a Malice in the Palace documentary is in the works produced by himself, Jermaine O’Neal and Metta World Peace

Stephen Jackson confirms that a Malice in the Palace documentary is in the works produced by himself, Jermaine O’Neal and Metta World Peace

Stephen Jackson said that a documentary about the infamous Malice at the Palace is in the works. He confirmed this to the Score’s  Joseph Casciaro on the “Pound The Rock” podcast.

“Shout out to Jermaine and Ron. Jermaine O’Neal has been heading this thing and we’re real close to having the deal done for the documentary on the brawl. It’s gonna be crazy, man. A lot of people don’t know Ron Artest is still cool with the guy who threw the beer on him, they talk all the time. So it’s gonna be crazy to see everything that went on because there’s a lot of stuff that people don’t know went on. A lot of fouls took place. A lot of stuff was going on behind the scenes that the camera will never show: how we was treated, all the stuff that was thrown on us, us getting into it with the security guards in Detroit; it’s so much to the story, man.”

Jackson was one of the central figures of the brawl which also involved former Indiana Pacers players Metta World Peace (then known as Ron Artest) and Jermaine O’Neal. Near the end of their game against the Detroit Pistons, tempers flared which eventually led to a massive brawl that spilled onto the fan’s section. The incident resulted to a combined 146 games suspension – 137 games for Pacers players and nine games for Pistons players. Artest was given the longest suspension; he was suspended for the remainder of the 2004–05 NBA season, a suspension that eventually totaled 86 games (73 regular season and 13 subsequent playoff games), the longest suspension for an on-court incident in NBA history. The players suspended also lost in excess of $11 million in salary due to the suspensions, with Artest alone losing almost $5 million.

It all sounds very interesting but the NBA will still have to approve of all the needed licensed footage to produce such a documentary. The NBA has worked hard to ultimately put this incident behind them. In an effort to recuperate the league’s image, David Stern later initiated a dress code that forced players to wear professional clothing as they entered the arena. He also banned hip-hop related paraphernalia such as do-rags, chains, t-shirts, and hats, causing many to question if the move was racially motivated. Stern insisted it was for the best interest of the league.