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Steve Kerr explains what makes Steph Curry “a lot like Michael Jordan”

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There's not a lot of players that deserve to be placed alongside Michael Jordan. Kobe Bryant is one of the first names that comes to mind, mainly because of their eerily similar playstyle. There's also LeBron James, who many believe is not just the greatest of his era but someone who could snatch the crown from Jordan. 

Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr who has witnessed all three players in their prime, offered a rather uncanny name to be put alongside MJ. It's his very own player, sharpshooting guard Stephen Curry. For Kerr, it isn't necessarily because the two share similar play styles or are constantly in the GOAT debates. Rather, both Curry and Jordan have had so many notable plays that have come to define their respective eras.

We can accuse Kerr of being biased. After all, his partnership with Curry produced three titles in five years. This season, the Warriors are once again the favorites to win it all. If everything goes as planned, Kerr might win his fourth title as a coach, so it would sit nicely with the five other rings he won as a player. 

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But from an objective point of view, Kerr's comparison has a lot of truth in it. When we think of Curry, images of logo 3-pointers, no-look 3-pointers, 3-point records broken, constant off-ball movement come to mind. Statistics reveal that NBA teams have been chucking up more and more 3-pointers for the last couple of years. Coaches have integrated the 3-pointer in their playbooks.

Because of Curry, they no longer deemed the 3-pointer as a poor and inefficient shot. Now, highlight clips are not only filled with dunks and acrobatic shots. They are also peppered with long-distance shots. So it's an understatement that Curry revolutionized how the game is being played today.

Back in the 90s, Jordan had a similar (if not a more significant impact). Clutch shots, hanging in the air with his tongue out, 40-point games, 50-point games, Air Jordans, and the string of championships — these are the things that come to mind when we hear or see the name Michael Jordan. 

After Kerr's declaration, it might be time to include Curry in those endless GOAT debates. The Warriors guard ticks all the boxes: he has won multiple titles, changed how the game is played, and is inspiring the next generation to create and trek their path to greatness. 

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