Skip to main content

Stephen A. Smith compares the Miami Heat to “a bunch of construction workers” after their brick-filled Game 5

When the Celtics limit their mistakes, the Heat struggle to score, and their half-court offense has had no answer for Boston's stingy defense
Stephen A. Smith compares the Miami Heat to “a bunch of construction workers” after their brick-filled Game 5

Sometimes Smith can get a bit carried away with his colorful commentary, but he’s spot on here. The Heat had absolutely nothing going for them on offense all night long

The Eastern Conference Finals feature two of the best defensive teams in the NBA, the Boston Celtics and Miami Heat. The series has been gruesome for the most part, with both teams doing their best to implement their defensive game plan and make the other side struggle to get any offense. Through five games, the Celtics are beginning to win this war of attrition.

Miami shot just 31.9 percent from the field in Game 5, including a paltry 15.6 percent on three-pointers. They struggled to get open looks all night long, and even when they did, they typically ended up missing them anyway. It led to a typically impassioned rant from ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith after the game:

“I don’t care who you are, I don’t care how great or putrid your defense is, if you can’t make shots, anybody can beat you, and that was the Miami Heat tonight. They resembled a bunch of construction workers, looking like they were throwing bricks all over the damn place.” - Stephen A. Smith, ESPN.

Smith provides a perfect analogy for the Heat’s offense in Game 5

Sometimes Smith can get a bit carried away with his colorful commentary, but he’s spot on here. The Heat had absolutely nothing going for them on offense all night long. They took 23 more shots from the field than the Celtics last night, but it didn’t matter because Boston still made three more field goals than them. In a series that has featured some ugly offensive outings, Miami’s performance in Game 5 was the worst of them all.

Scroll to Continue

Recommended Articles

In a way, it makes sense. Both sides are struggling with injuries, but it’s becoming clear it’s taking a massive toll on Miami. They were without Tyler Herro for the second straight game last night, and guys like Jimmy Butler, Kyle Lowry, and P.J. Tucker are playing at less than 100 percent. They have been no match for Boston’s stingy defense without their expected offensive contributions.

How the Celtics are slowing down the Heat on offense

Smith’s construction worker analogy works for the Heat because the Celtics force them into so many tough shots. But how have they managed to do it so consistently in Games 4 & 5 after letting Miami run wild early on in the series?

Sometimes, the best defense starts on offense, and that’s been the case for Boston. They struggled with ball security in the first half of Game 5, turning the ball over ten times. They cut that number down to five in the second half, and they unsurprisingly ran away with the game.

Miami makes their money by outworking their opponent, and that’s what they did in the first half of this game. They forced turnovers, made hustle plays, and constantly came up with offensive rebounds.

But when they cannot do that, the Heat are in big trouble. When Boston gets back and sets up their half-court defense, Miami has had practically no offense to speak of. Most of their first-half points came from Boston turning the ball over or offensive rebounds. It wasn’t even a contest once the C’s cleaned up their act in the second half.

When the Celtics limit their mistakes and don’t give the Heat free points, the Heat have struggled to score points. Boston is building a path to the Finals on the back of Miami’s bricks, and with another subpar shooting outing from them in Game 6, the Boston Celtics could finally complete that path.

Brooklyn Nets guard Kyrie Irving and forward Kevin Durant

5 duos that played more games than Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving did

Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving spent 3 years together and yet these 5 duo's still played together more than they did.

Milwaukee Bucks center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

"Cultural differences" — The real reason why Kareem Abdul-Jabbar wanted out of Milwaukee

Interestingly, the Los Angeles Lakers were Kareem's third choice on his list of preferred teams.

Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James

“Quit jogging and sh*t and get a fuc***g layup!” — when LeBron James scolded a teammate for being lazy

Often labeled as lacking a killer instinct, LeBron showed he has no patience for anything but effort and excellence from his teammates.

Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant and Cleveland Cavaliers guard Kobe Bryant

“Dude it worked, your advice worked!” — Kyrie Irving first called Kobe Bryant after winning the 2016 championship

After the Clevland Cavaliers won their first title in franchise history, Kyrie Irving's first call was to Kobe Bryant, straight from the locker room. The craziest part - Kobe almost didn't pick up.

Jeanie Buss admits missing Kobe Bryant: Honestly, he was the greatest Laker ever

Jeanie Buss admits missing Kobe Bryant: "Honestly, he was the greatest Laker ever"

As rumors swirl about Kevin Durant or Kyrie Irving suiting up for the L.A. Lakers, owner Jeanie Buss remembers Kobe Bryant's loyalty to the team.

Los Angeles Lakers forward Carmelo Anthony

Carmelo Anthony shares the Notorious B.I.G. rap verse that he lives by

Carmelo Anthony crawled his way out of the rough Baltimore streets. He knows that not everyone was as fortunate as him.