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SHAQ REVEALS HOW JEFF BEZOS AND PHIL JACKSON helped him become a great investor

BEZOS JACKSON SHAQ

Shaquille O'Neal, arguably the most dominant NBA player ever, 15x All-Star, and 4x NBA Champion, has also been one of the most successful basketball players off the court as well. Shaq started investing his money early in his playing career, and today he is one of the most successful ex-NBA entrepreneurs.

Recently, in an interview with Andy Frye of Forbes magazine, The Big Aristotle revealed that he owes much of his success to the wisdom and advice he received from his former coach Phil Jackson, and the richest man on Earth, Jeff Bezos.

Apparently, at the beginning of his investing career, Shaq made poor financial moves as he was basing his decisions solely on profit. So he started making investments into companies and businesses that seemed too good to be true.

That is until the year he met Jeff Bezos at the world-famous CES Trade show in Las Vegas:

"...Later, when I started going to CES in Vegas, I met a young, beautiful man by the name of Jeff Bezos. And with all the (business ventures) going fully online, he explained what the future holds. And he said that he invests in things that are going to change peoples’ lives. And I said: 'you know what, I’m gonna start doing that.' And when I did that, every time I invest in something it works. So, I don’t always think about just the money, but instead 'is this going to help people in their lives?'"

Shaquille O'Neal, Forbes

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After learning a truly valuable lesson from Bezos, Shaq then used the wisdom passed down onto him from The Zenmaster himself. Phil Jackson apparently taught Diesel how to be optimistic and look at the best possible outcomes with rationality.

“Phil would talk about waiting to see what happens and then reacting to it. And he always talked about facing the moment of truth. And when you face the moment of truth, then you act.”

Shaquille O'Neal, Forbes

With mentors like that, Shaq's success off the court doesn't come as a surprise. And with the amount of money he makes, you already know the O'Neal family will continue to eat well.

If you want to get a better insight into Shaq's business empire, peep the Basketball Network original below:

Big men do big things.

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