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Kevin Durant explains how going to the 73-9 Warriors was joining "an underdog"

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On the basketball court, Kevin Durant is an unstoppable force. A few days ago, Blake Griffin gave an amazing explanation of KD's dominance, saying he's “never seen a player be less affected a defender.” That's a level only the greatest offensive players in the history of the game have achieved. When their skill level and IQ peaks and there's nothing you can do to stop him. But as we all know, Durant is also an unstoppable force on social media, and to paraphrase Blake; I've never seen someone less affected by facts.

KD takes pride in his basketball knowledge - a lot of players want to be called "a student of the game." Given his last statement on joining the Warriors, we can only conclude Durant has reached a professor emeritus level understanding of basketball, an intellectual plain unreachable for most of us. Here's how he explained why joining the 73-9 Warriors wasn't joining the best team in basketball.

“The organization never been a winning organization. When I was in the league, nobody liked Golden State. So, it felt still like an underdog to me. Because I’m looking at the totality of the franchise. I ain’t looking at what happened these last five years. You’ve never been a perennial winner in the NBA -- from the 50s on up.”

Kevin Durant, NBA Sports

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Let me make one thing clear. I never had a problem with Durant joining one of the best teams in NBA history. If you got a chance to work on TV, would you join the guys on Inside the NBA or whatever ESPN comes up with? It's not even about winning a lot of games; sharing the court with Steph, Klay, Draymond, and Igoudala is basketball nirvana. Can't blame Durant for wanting to be a part of that. 

And I can't say I'm surprised KD is contradicting himself. But it's not very often he does it in the same interview.

“And I think they’re going to give me that experience that I want, that run of like, 'S--t, we’re about to go on a run trying to win 16 games.' I wanted that feeling again. We did that s--t three times. I was on that high three times. Man, s--t, I don’t want to go nowhere else. I wanted to do nothing else in the NBA besides go on a run like that. We might not win it. But to know we can go on a run to be one of the last teams, that s--t is fun.”

Kevin Durant, NBA Sports

He joined an underdog team that can give him a legitimate chance to go on a 16 win run in the Playoffs, and do it for three years straight. I wish they asked Durant to define "underdog." You can't make this stuff up. If we zoom out a bit, consider this fact - Durant is legitimately considered the stabilizing force in Brooklyn's Big 3.

On the court, KD was born in the right era. Off the court, he's in the wrong one. Social media is not a healthy environment with someone so insecure and obsessed with his public image. 

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