Julius Erving believes the older generation of players doesn’t get the recognition it deserves while talking about his all-time starting five

Julius Erving believes the older generation of players doesn’t get the recognition it deserves while talking about his all-time starting five

A lot of the younger NBA fans don’t know much about the players that were dominant before the ’90s and especially 80’s. Only real basketball heads know about the older players that predominantly played in the ’60s and the ’70s who served as an inspiration for the generations that would come later. In an interview, Julius Erving who is also known as “The Doctor” talks about that generation of the player and their importance of setting the foundation for the future generation of players.

Erving thinks the NBA doesn’t appreciate enough what older generation of players did, and especially ABA which after merging with the NBA shaped the league in what it is today. Erving thinks a lot of the fans think the NBA started in 1992 when Michael Jordan already asserted himself as the best player in the league and they are neglecting all the great players that played decades before him. When talking about the former NBA stars Erving remembers his favorite players growing up who are still his all-time best starting five.

“I think the NBA doesn’t work hard enough on preserving the legacy of the ABA and its self-serving. Lots of times I watch the TV and they’ll talk about something being done for the first time that never happened before. There were a lot of things that happened prior to 1992 that doesn’t get talked about, prior to the Michael Jordan era. Oscar Robertson, Bill Russell, Elgin Baylor who is my favorite player of all time, Jerry West and obviously the Big Dipper, Wilt Chamberlain. That is my all-time best five and I decided that when I was 14,15 years old and I’m sticking to. They deserve to be recognized for laying down the foundation that is making a lot of money for the NBA.”