JERRY STACKHOUSE DESCRIBES HOW Latrell Sprewell and Alvin Robertson were the first players to bust his a** during his rookie season

JERRY STACKHOUSE DESCRIBES HOW Latrell Sprewell and Alvin Robertson were the first players to bust his a** during his rookie season

Former NBA player and two-time All-Star, Jerry Stackhouse, made a guest appearance on the ‘Knuckleheads’ podcast featuring Darius Miles and Quentin Richardson to talk about his career and other basketball-related topics. Stackhouse had an outstanding NBA career playing for several teams, and when coming to the NBA from the University of North Carolina, many analysts compared him to Michael Jordan. Stackhouse never achieved those heights in the league, but for an extended period, he was a very potent scorer capable of dropping 20-25 points on every team in the league.

When players make a transition from the NCAA to the NBA, there is a certain period of adjustment they need to go through. Stackhouse was already incredibly efficient as a rookie, averaging a little less than 20 points per game, but as a young kid playing among the big boys, there were a few matchups that left a great impression on him from the get-go.

Stackhouse explains how Latrell Sprewell and Alvin Robertson were the first players to bust his a** when he came to the NBA as a rookie in the 1995/96 season. At that time, Sprewell was one of the best two-way guards in the NBA while Robertson was a great defensive specialist, and they both gave Stackhouse a lot of problems during his first matchups against them.

“The first person to bust my ass was Spree. Spree got me in some pick n rolls boy. It was the Golden State Warriors version of Spree. But one of my first moments like that was against Alvin Robertson, though when he was up in Toronto. I had the ball in a triple threat position, and he just grabbed that, and I was like where am I. Welcome to the NBA young fella.

Jerry Stackhouse, via Knuckleheads Podcast

Sprewell was one of the most recognizable and best guards throughout the ’90s and the first part of the ’00s. On the other hand, Robertson established himself as one of the best defenders in the NBA, winning the DPOY award in 1986. Unfortunately, his career was cut short because of injuries, but in his prime, he was one of the best-undersized perimeter defenders in the NBA.