DRAYMOND HONEST ABOUT THE REFS “You ain’t going to treat me like I’m some young boy. I felt it was a lot of disrespect.”

DRAYMOND HONEST ABOUT THE REFS “You ain’t going to treat me like I’m some young boy. I felt it was a lot of disrespect.”

Draymond Green has been pretty active during the quarantine. He has made several guest appearances on different podcasts, with the last one of them being All The Smoke Podcast where he joined Matt Barnes and Stephen Jackson and discussed various topics, from differences between being officiated as a good and as a bad team to KD’s change of demeanor after 2017 NBA finals.

After Klay’s ACL injury in last year’s NBA finals and Durant signing with the Nets, it was apparent that after years of long playoffs runs, and this was going to be a down year for the Dubs. After Stephen Curry’s hand injury, the Warriors gave up on any competitive side of the season. They decided to use this year to let their star players fully recover and develop their young talents under the mentorship of their veterans.

Draymond Green, Warriors’ on and off the court leader, had a crucial role in mentoring young prospects. The lack of competitive games was frustrating for Green, and Warriors being bad caused the refs to officiate them differently. Not getting 50-50 calls and having less credit to argue the refs was caused by Warriors not being as dominant as they were for five previous years.

“I’ve been on the best team in the world for the last five years, so I grew accustomed to that, and I remember like sorry ass teams always saying to us like you’re getting calls like a motherf—er and I was like we ain’t getting no calls, but now being on a sorry ass team this year, I saw exactly what they were talking about. At times it was like referee’s opportunity to get back, and they now start talking to you like you’re a little boy, and I’m like I’m still Draymond Green, you ain’t going to treat me like I’m some young boy. I felt it was a lot of disrespect.”

Draymond Green, All The Smoke

Draymond also revealed that after the 2017 NBA finals, Durant changed. “In my opinion, he got the best of ‘Bron,” said Green while reminiscing on that finals series. It seems that the overall view of the Warriors’ locker room was that KD outplaying LeBron meant that the new best player in the world was wearing the Dubs’ jersey. However, the media kept pushing the narrative about James still holding that title. Green talks about that rubbing KD the wrong way, causing his behavior toward his teammates to change.

“All of a sudden it was kind of just like, ‘Why’s Steph shooting this shot?’ or ‘He ain’t pass the ball’ or ‘Why’s Klay shooting this shot?’ or ‘Why he ain’t pass the ball?’ And I’m just sitting there like, ‘Yo, that’s the same Klay and Steph I’ve always played with. Like, they ain’t playing no different than they’ve always played.’ And I know those two guys, they’re not looking you off. They may not see you, because they’ve got tunnel vision at times, which most scorers do have tunnel vision at times, and that’s why they’re great scorers, but they ain’t gonna never just look you off. I’ve been playing with them since I came into this league. That ain’t who they are.”

Draymond Green, All The Smoke

The debate about who at the time was the best player in the world went on throughout the season, and it was apparent Durant felt like he didn’t receive the credit he deserved. The best player of the world saga contributed to Durant ultimately leaving the Warriors after realizing that he wasn’t going to get the credit he deserved, mainly because he was a part of a historically great team making he’s success expected.